This library contains publications developed under the Safe Havens: Supervised Visitation and Safe Exchange Grant Program (Supervised Visitation Program). These publications address the provision of supervised visitation and safe exchange services in situations where domestic violence is present.

"You can’t be held accountable if you don’t count" The Impact of the National Institute on Fatherhood, Domestic Violence and Visitation (NIFDV) on the Capacity of Supervised Visitation Centers to Engage Men and Enhance Family Safety. (2013)

Author:  Lisa Goodman, Ph.D., Margret Bell, Ph.D., Jennifer Rose, Consultant on behalf of Futures Without Violence

Futures Without Violence surveyed and pulled together a group of grantee communities to identify: lessons learned, obstacles to implementation, and to develop next steps for deepening our work with women, men and children using supervised visitation and safe exchange programs. Key findings in the following report include shifts in philosophical beliefs and program interest in engaging with men who batter.

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(10 page PDF)


Beyond Observation: Considerations for Advancing Domestic Violence Practice in Supervised Visitation (2008) Cover

Beyond Observation: Considerations for Advancing Domestic Violence Practice in Supervised Visitation (2008)

Author:  Jay Campbell, Derrick Gordon, and Ona Foster on behalf of Futures Without Violence (formerly Family Violence Prevention Fund)

This publication presents considerations for expanded practice in the Supervised Visitation Program and describes interventions that go beyond observation in the supervised visitation setting. The information for this publication comes from a number of sources, including interviews with experts in the field; a review of the literature on supervised visitation; observations of center operations; and focus groups conducted with consumers, staff, judges, lawyers and key constituents of supervised visitation centers.

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(50 page PDF)


Building Safety, Repairing Harm: Lessons Learned from the Office on Violence Against Women’s Safe Havens: Supervised Visitation and Safe Exchange Grant Program – Demonstration Initiative (2008) Cover

Building Safety, Repairing Harm: Lessons Learned from the Office on Violence Against Women’s Safe Havens: Supervised Visitation and Safe Exchange Grant Program – Demonstration Initiative (2008)

Author:  Jane Sadusky on behalf of Praxis International, Inc.

This report presents the demonstration initiative’s collective and individual examination of visitation center practices, community partnerships, cultural accessibility, security, and sustainability. The four demonstration sites were: the Bay Area, CA; the City of Chicago, IL; the City of Kent, WA; and the State of Michigan.

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(150 page PDF)


Concepts in Creating Culturally Responsive Services for Supervised Visitation Centers (2007) Cover

Concepts in Creating Culturally Responsive Services for Supervised Visitation Centers (2007)

Author:  Dr. Oliver J. Williams on behalf of the Institute on Domestic Violence in the African American Community

This publication was developed to assist Supervised Visitation Program grantee communities with examining how they serve culturally diverse populations. It encourages grantee communities to reflect on the good work they already do and to consider how they can enhance their efforts to support diverse populations in the context of court-referred supervised visitation when domestic violence is an issue.

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(36 page PDF)


Demonstration Initiative Site Profiles Cover

Demonstration Initiative Site Profiles

Author:  Praxis International, Inc.

Overview: The Supervised Visitation Program was established by the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2000 (42 U.S.C. § 10420). In 2002, the U.S. Department of Justice's Office on Violence Against Women (OVW) developed and implemented a four-year demonstration initiative to examine promising practices in the field of supervised visitation and safe exchange. OVW awarded grants to four demonstration sites: the Bay Area, CA; the City of Chicago, IL; the City of Kent, WA; and the State of Michigan.

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(25 page PDF)


Designing Supervised Visitation and Exchange Centers That Promote Safety Cover

Designing Supervised Visitation and Exchange Centers That Promote Safety

Author:  Lauren J. Litton and Tiffany Martinez

For families that have experienced domestic violence, the exchange of children present opportunities for the parent that has used violence to continue to inflict physical or psychological harm on their children and former partner. Unfortunately, across the country countless incidents exist of battering continuing during visits and exchanges. To promote adult victim and child safety in situations where there is domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, child abuse, or stalking, Congress authorized the pilot of the Safe Havens: Supervised Visitation and Safe Exchange Grant Program (Supervised Visitation Program) through the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act in 2000.

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(40 page PDF)


Engage to Protect: Foundations for Supervised Visitation and Exchange – Discussion Paper 1: Recognizing and Understanding Battering (2009) Cover

Engage to Protect: Foundations for Supervised Visitation and Exchange – Discussion Paper 1: Recognizing and Understanding Battering (2009)

Author:  Ellen Pence and Jane Sadusky on behalf of Praxis International, Inc.

This discussion paper examines the various types of domestic violence. Domestic violence is a broad category that has come to include many kinds of violence and behaviors within relationships between intimate partners and, in most states, relationships between family and other household members. The term domestic violence tends to focus attention on acts of physical violence and obscure attention to ongoing coercion, intimidation, and emotional harm. The lack of distinction about the type and intent of violence has led to a generic response that fails to make critical distinctions in its deliberations and actions on behalf of the state.

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(12 page PDF)


Engage to Protect: Foundations for Supervised Visitation and Exchange – Discussion Paper 2: Engaging with Battered Women in Supervised Visitation Centers (2009) Cover

Engage to Protect: Foundations for Supervised Visitation and Exchange – Discussion Paper 2: Engaging with Battered Women in Supervised Visitation Centers (2009)

Author:  Maren Hansen-Kramer, Julie Tilley, Beth McNamara, and Jane Sadusky on behalf of Praxis International, Inc.

This discussion paper sets forth a framework for working with mothers who have been battered that requires thoughtful engagement with these women. Meeting these goals rests on the approach, as made possible by workers’ knowledge and skills in key areas, which are discussed.

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(28 page PDF)


Engage to Protect: Foundations for Supervised Visitation and Exchange – Discussion Paper 3: Engaging with Men who Batter in Supervised Visitation Centers (2009) Cover

Engage to Protect: Foundations for Supervised Visitation and Exchange – Discussion Paper 3: Engaging with Men who Batter in Supervised Visitation Centers (2009)

Author:  Maren Hansen-Kramer, Julie Tilley, Beth McNamara, and Jane Sadusky on behalf of Praxis International, Inc.

This discussion paper presents a framework for safely and skillfully engaging with fathers who have been or are currently battering their children’s mother. Meeting these goals rests on the approach, as made possible by workers’ knowledge and skills in key areas, which are discussed.

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(28 page PDF)


Engage to Protect: Foundations for Supervised Visitation and Exchange – Discussion Paper 4: Informing the Practice of Supervised Visitation (2009) Cover

Engage to Protect: Foundations for Supervised Visitation and Exchange – Discussion Paper 4: Informing the Practice of Supervised Visitation (2009)

Author:  Melanie Shepard, Jane Sadusky, and Beth McNamara on behalf of Praxis International, Inc.

This discussion paper reviews six approaches to learning about the quality and impact of supervised visitation practices from participants, staff, volunteers, and community partners. They include: questionnaires, interviews, focus groups, check-ins, case file reviews, and case consultations.

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(20 page PDF)


Engage to Protect: Foundations for Supervised Visitation and Exchange – Discussion Paper 5: Crafting Policies that Account for Battering (2009) Cover

Engage to Protect: Foundations for Supervised Visitation and Exchange – Discussion Paper 5: Crafting Policies that Account for Battering (2009)

Author:  Ellen Pence and Jane Sadusky on behalf of Praxis International, Inc.

The approach to crafting policies described in this discussion paper has the Supervised Visitation Program’s Guiding Principles as its backdrop. It has been written primarily for centers that have elected to operate within those principles. While it is convenient to cut and paste, policies must belong to an organization. The process of policy making is crucial to an organization’s ability to successfully implement those very policies. This paper offers nine tips that can help a visitation program stay on course as it maneuvers through the complexities of policymaking.

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(28 page PDF)


Fathering After Violence: Working with Abusive Fathers in Supervised Visitation (2008) Cover

Fathering After Violence: Working with Abusive Fathers in Supervised Visitation (2008)

Author:  Juan Carlos Areán on behalf of Futures Without Violence (formerly Family Violence Prevention Fund)

This guide is intended to assist the grantee communities of the Supervised Visitation Program that want to enhance the safety and well-being of women and children by working more deliberately with abusive fathers who use the centers to visit their children. Although fathers are not always the visiting parents and, in fact, in some centers mothers make up almost half of the visiting caseload, this document was designed to target in particular visiting fathers who have been violent with their intimate partners.

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(54 page PDF)


Guiding Principles of the Safe Havens: Supervised Visitation and Safe Exchange Grant Program (2007) Cover

Guiding Principles of the Safe Havens: Supervised Visitation and Safe Exchange Grant Program (2007)

Author:  The National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges on behalf of the Office on Violence Against Women

The Guiding Principles of the Safe Havens: Supervised Visitation and Safe Exchange Grant Program (Guiding Principles) are designed to guide the development and administration of centers funded under this program with an eye toward addressing the needs of child(ren) and adult victims of domestic violence in visitation and exchange settings. The Guiding Principles look beyond the visitation setting to address how communities funded under this program should address domestic violence in the larger community.

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(52 page PDF)


New Perspectives on Supervised Visitation and Safe Exchange: Orientation (2008) Cover

New Perspectives on Supervised Visitation and Safe Exchange: Orientation (2008)

Author:  Jane Sadusky on behalf of Praxis International, Inc.

This document provides an overview of a shift in practice under the Supervised Visitation Program: the change from agency-centered intake to person-centered orientation as a framework for welcoming mothers, fathers, and children to the experience of supervised visitation. It presents the broad sweep of questions and new perspectives that have emerged from the work and discussions involving the Office on Violence Against Women, the demonstration initiative sites, other grantee communities, and the grant program’s technical assistance partners.

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(41 page PDF)


On Safety’s Side: Protecting Those Vulnerable to Violence (2008) Cover

On Safety’s Side: Protecting Those Vulnerable to Violence (2008)

Author:  Martha McMahon and Ellen Pence on behalf of Praxis International, Inc.

This document is an invitation to visitation centers serving families with a history of domestic violence to engage far more actively and broadly in the work of protecting victims of violence. Doing so involves protecting both adult and child victims and requires a re-examination of the idea that visitation centers have an obligation to the court to be neutral in the "conflict between parents using a center."

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(48 page PDF)


Ozha Wahbeganniss: Exploring Supervised Visitation & Exchange Services in Native American Communities  Cover

Ozha Wahbeganniss: Exploring Supervised Visitation & Exchange Services in Native American Communities

Author:  Lauren J. Litton and Dr. Oliver J. Williams on behalf of the Institute on Domestic Violence in the African American Community

This report reflects the first step in an opportunity to critically think about how supervised visitation and safe exchange services can be crafted and implemented by tribal communities in a manner that offers safety, respect, healing, health, and serenity. It highlights recommendations stemming from discussion groups held with Native American professionals and consumers about how these services can be created in a way that both meets the needs of families and is valued by the community.

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(24 page PDF)


Responding to Stalking Cover

Responding to Stalking

Author:  The National Center for Victims of Crime

Stalking is a serious and dangerous crime; yet, it is also often misunderstood, minimized, or overlooked entirely. Evidence of stalking—harassing phone calls or text messages, showing up at a victims’ school or work uninvited—is sometimes interpreted as a pattern of domestic violence, rather than a distinct crime that should be identified and assessed. Recognizing stalking and its intersection with domestic violence is critical for evaluating the risk of further violence and lethality. Over 7.5 million people are stalked in one year in the United States, and most commonly, the stalker is a current or former intimate partner. Abusers stalk for many reasons: to track, monitor, gather information, harass, and intimidate; and to attempt to maintain or regain control over the victim. These offenders will frequently use any means available, including a wide variety of technologies. Because victims can be stalked as they come and go from the supervised visitation center, during the visitation or exchange, and in between visits, it is critical that Supervised Visitation/Safe Exchange program staff recognize and effectively respond to stalking. This booklet will address the definition and dynamics of stalking, the intersection of stalking and domestic violence, the intersection of stalking and supervised visitation and safe exchange, safety considerations, and policies and procedures, and will also provide additional resources.

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(9 page PDF)


Safe Passage: Supervised Safe Exchange for Battered Women and Their Children (2010) Cover

Safe Passage: Supervised Safe Exchange for Battered Women and Their Children (2010)

Author:  Jane Sadusky on behalf of Praxis International, Inc.

"Safe exchange" has been the phrase that follows supervised visitation since the Supervised Visitation Program was first established through the Office on Violence Against Women in 2002. It is a service associated with supervised visitation centers, but one that has been largely overshadowed by the attention to supervised visits. This publication sums up key issues in supervised safe exchange, presents strategies to address those issues, and suggests policy and procedure changes that will help visitation programs deliver this critical service as skillfully and safely as possible.

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(68 page PDF)


Safety and Accountability Audit Reports for the Demonstration Initiative Sites – Bay Area, CA (2004, revised 2006) Cover

Safety and Accountability Audit Reports for the Demonstration Initiative Sites – Bay Area, CA (2004, revised 2006)

Author:  Praxis International, Inc.

The four sites chosen as demonstration initiative sites under the Safe Havens: Supervised Visitation and Safe Exchange Demonstration Initiative were required to conduct community-based assessments utilizing the methodologies of the Praxis Safety and Accountability Audit. Each demonstration site explored a different question related to the design and delivery of visitation and exchange services. The Bay Area explored how the work of visitation centers produces safety for everyone involved.

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(33 page PDF)


Safety and Accountability Audit Reports for the Demonstration Initiative Sites – City of Chicago, IL (2005) Cover

Safety and Accountability Audit Reports for the Demonstration Initiative Sites – City of Chicago, IL (2005)

Author:  Praxis International, Inc.

The four sites chosen as demonstration initiative sites under the Safe Havens: Supervised Visitation and Safe Exchange Demonstration Initiative were required to conduct community-based assessments utilizing the methodologies of the Praxis Safety and Accountability Audit. Each demonstration site explored a different question related to the design and delivery of visitation and exchange services. The City of Chicago explored how visitation centers account for peoples’ unique cultures and identities.

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(35 page PDF)


Safety and Accountability Audit Reports for the Demonstration Initiative Sites – City of Kent, WA (2007) Cover

Safety and Accountability Audit Reports for the Demonstration Initiative Sites – City of Kent, WA (2007)

Author:  Praxis International, Inc.

The four sites chosen as demonstration initiative sites under the Safe Havens: Supervised Visitation and Safe Exchange Demonstration Initiative were required to conduct community-based assessments utilizing the methodologies of the Praxis Safety and Accountability Audit. Each demonstration site explored a different question related to the design and delivery of visitation and exchange services. The City of Kent explored how victims of battering who might benefit from supervised visitation services identify and access them.

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(38 page PDF)


Safety and Accountability Audit Reports for the Demonstration Initiative Sites – State of Michigan (2004) Cover

Safety and Accountability Audit Reports for the Demonstration Initiative Sites – State of Michigan (2004)

Author:  Praxis International, Inc.

The four sites chosen as demonstration initiative sites under the Safe Havens: Supervised Visitation and Safe Exchange Demonstration Initiative were required to conduct community community-based assessments utilizing the methodologies of the Praxis Safety and Accountability Audit. Each demonstration site explored a different question related to the design and delivery of visitation and exchange services. The State of Michigan explored the role of supervised visitation centers.

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(33 page PDF)


Supervised Visitation Programs: Information for Mothers who have Experienced Abuse (2007) Cover

Supervised Visitation Programs: Information for Mothers who have Experienced Abuse (2007)

Author:  Jill Davies on behalf of Futures Without Violence (formerly Family Violence Prevention Fund)

This guide is for mothers who have experienced abuse and whose children are in supervised visitation programs. It provides basic information about how supervised visitation programs work and how mothers can prepare themselves and their children for the experience.

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(28 page PDF)


VOICES of Mothers and Fathers Cover

VOICES of Mothers and Fathers

Author:  Lauren Litton and Tiffany Martinez

It is well documented that when there is a history of domestic violence the violence often does not end because the parties have separated or ended their relationship. Instead, the tactics used to exert control over a victim shift; this is especially true when the adult victim and batterer have children in common. When there is a history of domestic violence, visitation or parenting time can be an opportunity for the perpetrator of violence to continue to inflict physical or psychological harm on their children and former partner. To promote adult victim and child safety in situations where there is domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, child abuse or stalking, the Violence Against Women Act authorized the creation and implementation of the Safe Havens: Supervised Visitation and Safe Exchange Grant Program (Supervised Visitation Program). The Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women, began administering the Supervised Visitation Program in 2002.

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(24 page PDF)