Safe Havens:  Supervised Visitation and Safe Exchange Grant Program

St. Louis, MO

September 8-9, 2014

Alicia Aiken, J.D.

Alicia Aiken, J.D.

Alicia Aiken is the Executive Director of Confidentiality Institute, a national organization ensuring privacy and client-centered services for crime victims through training and technical assistance to helping professionals. Ms. Aiken spent 15 years with LAF (Legal Assistance Foundation), the largest legal services program in Illinois, where she represented victims of domestic violence and people living in poverty in wide variety of complex legal matters. While at LAF, Ms. Aiken rose to the position of Director of Training, Pro Bono and Client Support Services. Ms. Aiken has practiced trial and appellate law in criminal and civil courts in Illinois, Vermont, and Michigan. She has taught for the University of Michigan, DePaul College of Law, the American Bar Association, the Office on Violence Against Women, the Allstate Foundation, the National Network to End Domestic Violence, among others. Ms. Aiken is being honored with the 2014 Community Partner Award from the Center for Advancing Domestic Peace. She was the Chair of the Chicago Bar Association Domestic Relations Committee, was named to the list of 40 Attorneys Under 40 to Watch in Illinois, received the Chicago Foundation for Women Founder’s Award, and accepted LAF’s Equal Justice Award for appellate advocacy. Alicia Aiken received her undergraduate and law degrees from the University of Michigan.

Etiony Aldarondo, Ph.D.

Etiony Aldarondo, Ph.D.

Dr. Etiony Aldarondo is Associate Dean for Research and Director of the Dunspaugh-Dalton Community and Educational Well-Being Research Center in the School of Education and Human Development at the University of Miami. The recipient of various recognitions for educational excellence and community involvement, including the 2011 Social Justice Award from the American Psychological Association and the 2011 Elizabeth Beckman Award, his scholarship focuses on positive development of ethnic minority and immigrant youth, domestic violence, and social justice-oriented clinical practices. His publications include the books Advancing Social Justice through Clinical Practice (Routledge), Programs for men who batter: Intervention and prevention strategies in a diverse society (Civic Research Institute with Fernando Mederos, Ed.D.), and Neurosciences, Health and Community Well-Being (San Luís, Nueva Editorial Universitaria with Dr. Enrique Saforcada and Mauro Muñoz). Dr. Aldarondo has a long history of involvement with grass root advocacy organizations and federal government agencies such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Department of Health and Human Services, and the National Institute of Justice. He is executive director of The Council on Contemporary Families and serves on the scientific advisory boards for Casa de Esperanza, The Melissa Institute for Violence Prevention and Treatment, The Resource Center on Domestic Violence: Child Protection & Child Custody at the National Council for Juvenile and Family Court Judges, and The National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma & Mental Health.

Hon. Steven D. Aycock (Ret.)

Hon. Steven D. Aycock (Ret.)

Steve Aycock is the judge-in-residence of the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges. Until 2008 he was with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation where he had been the chief judge at the Colville Tribal Court for nine years. Previously, Judge Aycock worked for twelve years as the director of the Colville Tribal Legal Office where he represented individual members of the Tribes in civil matters. The office specialized in children and elders advocacy. He has also worked for Evergreen Legal Services in the Pasco, Washington office and as a public defender in Franklin County District and Superior Courts. From 1984-1986 he was a clinical instructor and in 2008 he taught Federal Indian Law at the University of Idaho, College of Law. Judge Aycock made presentations at the University of Washington, University of Kansas and Michigan State University law schools on issues related to Tribal Courts. He is currently a board member for the Committee to Aid Abused Women in Reno, Nevada. He served as a faculty member of the National Judicial Institute on Domestic Violence. Since coming to the National Council, he has presented at national conferences and state and tribal judicial conferences on various domestic violence issues. Judge Aycock received his Bachelor’s degree in political science from Washington State University in 1977. He graduated from the University of Idaho, College of Law in 1980.

Anneliese Brown

Anneliese Brown

Anneliese Brown joined Vera in May 2010 as a program associate with the Supervised Visitation Initiative, and recently began working with the Accessing Safety Initiative. In this role, she provides training and technical assistance to communities receiving funding through OVW’s Supervised Visitation Program and Disability Program, including coordinating the webinar series offered through both grant programs. Anneliese has been working to address domestic and sexual violence and stalking for over 10 years. Prior to joining Vera, she spent two years as the legal projects coordinator with the Vermont Network Against Domestic and Sexual Violence, where she coordinated statewide efforts to improve the response of the criminal justice and civil legal systems to victims of domestic and sexual violence, and provided technical assistance and training to advocates. From 2004 to 2006, Anneliese worked with the Family Violence Department of the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges (NCJFCJ), first as an information specialist and then as a project coordinator, overseeing NCJFCJ’s technical assistance on OVW’s Supervised Visitation Program. Anneliese has also served as the children’s program coordinator at a domestic and sexual violence agency in California and has advocated for victims of domestic and sexual violence in Alaska, Maine, and Vermont. Anneliese received her BA in women’s studies and psychology from Bates College.

Laura Connelly

Laura Connelly

Laura Connelly is the director of programming at Advocates for Family Peace (AFFP). As the director of programming she provides leadership on all programming of the agency. She also provides individual, criminal, systemic advocacy to victims of domestic violence, coordinates all volunteerism of the agency, co-facilitates a group for men who batter and for women who use violence, and coordinates all public awareness efforts of the agency. She has provided consultation on domestic violence programming for the Duluth Domestic Abuse Intervention Program, Supervised Visitation Network, Praxis International and the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges. She has contributed to numerous publications related to supervised visitation and domestic violence. She is the co-author of a curriculum and DVD for working with men who batter as fathers entitled, "Addressing Fatherhood with Men Who Batter". She also co-authored a curriculum and DVD for working with women who have used violence in intimate relationships entitled, "Turning Points: An Educational Curriculum for Women Who Use Violence in Intimate Relationships."

Lisa Ferentz, MSW, LCSW-C, DAPA

Lisa Ferentz, MSW, LCSW-C, DAPA

Lisa has a B.A. in Theatre, is an LCSW-C and is a Diplomate of the American Psychotherapy Association. She has been in private practice for 30 years, specializing in adolescent and adult survivors of trauma, abuse and neglect. She uses many creative modalities in her work to address issues of affect regulation, co-dependency, addictions, eating disorders and self-destructive behaviors, depression, anxiety, professional burn-out and self-care. Lisa presents workshops, lectures and keynote addresses nationally and internationally. She is a clinical consultant to private practitioners, domestic violence programs, and mental health agencies. She has been an Adjunct Faculty member at several Universities, and is the Founder and President of "The Institute for Advanced Psychotherapy Training and Education," an organization that has provided continuing education classes and Certificates in Advanced Trauma Treatment to mental health professionals for the past 7 years. In 2009 she was voted the "Social Worker of Year" by the Maryland Society for Clinical Social Work. Lisa has written several articles on self-destructive behaviors and a book entitled, "Treating Self-Destructive Behaviors in Traumatized Clients: A Clinician’s Guide." Her second book, "Letting Go of Self-Destructive Behaviors: A Workbook of Hope and Healing" is in press. Lisa was also the host of a weekly, live, National Internet-based radio talk show called "Inspired Journeys: Overcoming Adversity and Thriving." In her spare time, she acts, directs and choreographs for community theatre productions.

Michelle Garcia

Michelle Garcia

Michelle Garcia has been the Director of the Stalking Resource Center at the National Center for Victims of Crime (National Center) since October 2006. Prior to joining the National Center, Ms. Garcia was a Program Specialist with the U.S. Department of Justice, Office for Victims of Crime. She has more than 20 years of experience working with victims of stalking, sexual assault, and domestic violence, in both rural and urban settings, and advocating for victims’ rights on a local, state, and national level. Ms. Garcia has trained internationally on various topics, including stalking, sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and dismantling oppression. She currently serves on the Editorial Board of the Sexual Assault Report, the American Bar Association Commission on Domestic & Sexual Violence, and the Advisory Board of School and College Organization for Prevention Educators (SCOPE). She received her Master of Public Policy degree from the University of Chicago.

Veronica Linder

Veronica Linder

Veronica Linder is currently a software trainer at a major healthcare organization in Atlanta Georgia. In that role she trains new and returning employees on the organization's software use while ensuring that upon completion of their training, the participants also understand the company's mission and culture. Veronica is on the board of directors at DeKalb PATH Academy charter school in Atlanta where she serves as secretary. She is also on the board of directors at Community Christian Ministries, where she serves as Director of the Women's Ministry. Veronica is the mother of three children, Andrew, Christopher and Lauren. In her spare time she enjoys Zumba, swimming and meditation.

Tiffany Martinez

Tiffany Martinez

Tiffany Martinez is a licensed clinical social worker. Since that time, Ms. Martinez has dedicated her career to working with those affected by domestic violence, sexual assault, and child abuse. She has served in many capacities; functioning within the child welfare system as a foster care worker, providing family, individual, and group therapy to victims of violence, and most recently acting as director of a supervised visitation and exchange program. Currently, Ms. Martinez acts as an independent consultant providing training and technical assistance both locally and nationally on issues relating to family violence and supervised visitation and exchange. She obtained her master’s degree in social work from the University of Michigan in 1996.

Beth McNamara

Beth McNamara

Beth is a social worker who received her degree from the University of Wisconsin. Hailing from a small town in the Midwest, Ms. McNamara currently resides in the State of Montana. She has been an advocate to end violence against women since 1987. Her experience has covered the span of both sexual assault and domestic violence prevention work. Beth is the co-founder and co-executive director of Inspire Action for Social Change, a non-profit organization working to create social change and end violence against women and children. Since 2005 Beth has been working with Praxis International and also provides training and technical assistance as a consultant for the Family Violence Department for the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges as well as for Futures Without Violence. Beth was the director of the Family Service Agency, Family Visitation Center in the Bay Area of California for thirteen years. Over the course of her career in supervised visitation she planned, designed and operated five different supervised visitation centers. She was responsible for program operations, development, sustainability, training, direct service, advocacy, and the supervision and mentoring of staff and volunteers. Beth has also worked in the mental health and chemical dependency fields for several years in the early stages of her professional life.

Scott Miller

Scott Miller

Scott Miller has worked for the Domestic Abuse Intervention Project since 2000. Scott coordinates Duluth’s Coordinated Community Response to domestic violence under a demonstration project funded by OVW called the Blueprint for Safety. Serving as both system advocate and coordinator of the men’s nonviolence program, he is instrumental in the evolving work being done in Duluth. Scott trains nationally and internationally on the components of the Duluth Model of intervention and helps develop new resource materials and curricula for use in communities working to end violence against women. Scott has also co-authored the new DAIP men’s nonviolence curriculum Creating a Process of Change for Men Who Batter.

Scott works independently as an expert witness in criminal and civil trials to explain how the tactics of abusers and the associated risks generated by battering are linked to the counterintuitive behaviors of victims.

Scott is a contract trainer and forensic interviewer for First Witness Child Abuse Resource Center in Duluth. Scott is responsible for conducting forensically sound interviews of children suspected of being physically or sexually abused as part of a criminal investigation. Scott also conducts trainings nationally on how to conduct interviews with children and work from a multidisciplinary team approach in the investigation of child abuse.

Scott Miller has been working in the women’s movement since 1985.

Hon. Raquel Montoya-Lewis

Hon. Raquel Montoya-Lewis

Hon. Raquel Montoya-Lewis combines judicial and academic careers as Chief Judge for the Nooksack Indian Tribe and the Upper Skagit Indian Tribe and as Associate Professor of Law at Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies at Western Washington University. She also serves as an appellate judge for the Nisqually Tribe and the Northwest Intertribal Court System. As a judge, she writes decisions and opinions relied upon in other tribal jurisdictions. She has served as a tribal court judge for more than 10 years for several tribes. She presents nationally on engaging families and youth in dependency and juvenile court, Indian Child Welfare compliance, and tribal trial and appellate court practice. In 2010, Governor Christine Gregoire appointed her to the Washington State Advisory Group on Juvenile Justice. In August 2011, she was appointed to the Federal Advisory Committee on Juvenile Justice for a three year term, advising the President, Congress, and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention on juvenile justice issues with a particular focus on representing tribal children and issues. In her work in academics, she researches and writes on tribal law and federal Indian Law. She is an expert on issues related to child welfare and dependency, as well as tribal membership and enrollment. Her most recent article, Whiteness in a Red Room: Telling Stories and Legal Discourse in a Tribal Courtroom is published in the book Interdisciplinary and Social Justice, SUNY Press. She teaches courses on property law, Federal Indian Law, legal writing, and cultural identity. Prior to becoming a judge and professor, she practiced law representing Indian tribes across the United States, taught legal writing at the University of New Mexico, School of Law, and served as a judicial law clerk for Justice Pamela B. Minzner. She holds a JD from the University of Washington, School of Law and an MSW from the University of Washington, Graduate School of Social Work.

Lumarie Orozco, MA

Lumarie Orozco, MA

Lumarie Orozco, MA: Lumarie is a community psychologist, youth practitioner and trainer. Until recently, Lumarie managed Casa de Esperanza’s community engagement initiatives including Fuerza Unida (community engagement, leadership development) and Youth Initiatives (leadership, peer education and advocacy). Her work includes leadership training and curriculum development, psycho-educational support group facilitation and program development and implementation. Lumarie is a trainer for the National Latin@ Network for Healthy Families and Communities, a project of Casa de Esperanza with areas of expertise in leadership development, community engagement, youth development, program development and implementation, and youth advocacy. Lumarie is a 2011 Practitioner Fellow with the National Institute on Out of School Time, and a 2012 Practitioner Fellow with the Robert Bowne Foundation National Writing Project.

Tiffiny Ratcliff

Tiffiny Ratcliff

Tiffiny Ratcliff has been a nurse for thirteen years. Due to a near fatal accident suffered by her and her family, her life took a drastic turn. Tiffiny was ejected from the vehicle at six-months pregnant and had to learn to walk and talk again.

She now attends the University of Phoenix where she is pursuing a degree in psychology. Tiffiny is married and is mother to three beautiful boys. In her leisure time, she volunteers at her son’s elementary school, she is part of a ministry at her church, called, "Starting Over". The ministry does outreach to various domestic violence shelters and offers assistance to women and children. Tiffiny is a mentor to young women through a non-profit organization called, "Essex Girls". She enjoys reading, walking, listening to music, and spending time with her family.

Arlene Rivera

Arlene Rivera

Arlene was born and raised in Chicago IL in a single parent home. She has three brothers and no sisters. Arlene was the first one on her mother’s side of the family to graduate from High School. Arlene is the single mother of an intelligent, funny, and caring 11 year old boy named Nasean who is her world. Arlene met Nasean's father when she was 16 years old. They had a relationship for 7 years and lived together for the last 4 years of the relationship. She left the relationship when Nasean was only 1 ½ years old because of domestic violence.

After living with her mom for a few months Arlene moved out on her own with Nasean. She worked in the collections field for a few years until she was laid off of work. At that time Arlene decided to go back to school. She attended Wilbur Wright College in Chicago and obtained her associated degree in liberal arts.

In 2011 Arlene moved to Winter Haven FL where she now resides with her son. Arlene currently holds a Human Resource Specialist position at Winter Haven Hospital and is also pursuing her bachelor’s degree in supervision and management with a concentration in public administration from Polk State College. She anticipates graduating in December 2014. Arlene plans to further her education by pursuing a Master’s degree in Non-Profit Organization with a certification in Human Resource Management along with pursuing SPHR certification.

In her spare time Arlene enjoys hanging out with her son and traveling. She enjoys going to theme parks, festivals, and historical sights. Arlene’s dream is to open a center for single mom’s one day and to be a voice for single mom’s struggling trying to make a difference in their children’s life.

Brenda Rivera

Brenda Rivera

Brenda Rivera is the Managing Attorney for Dade Legal Aid’s Domestic Violence Division. Over 17 years ago, Ms. Rivera joined Dade Legal Aid to establish a satellite office dedicated to assisting battered immigrant and farmworker victims. Ms. Rivera’s work over the past 17 years has led to the creation of three additional satellite offices dedicated to serving victims of intimate partner violence. Each year more than 900 victims are provided legal assistance. For the past 13 years, Ms. Rivera has also directed the Domestic Violence and Family Law Clinic at St. Thomas University School of law where her students provide legal representation to victims and survivors of intimate partner violence and sexual assault. She has served on various boards, committees and networks addressing domestic violence, sexual assault and human trafficking.

Jennifer Rose

Jennifer Rose

Jennifer Rose has been working as an advocate & activist to end violence against women and children for the past 20 years. Jennifer is the co-founder of Inspire Action for Social Change and is currently working as a consultant, locally and nationally, to provide training and technical assistance on the issues of violence against women and girls, supervised visitation and safe exchange, engaging men who batter, oppression, community organizing, and LGBTQ issues. Jennifer has recently returned to the Walnut Avenue Women’s Center as the Co-Executive Director. During her first tenure at WAWC she worked to build a program that provided both crisis intervention and long-term advocacy and support for women and their families. In this role she also opened a supervised visitation center that was part of a national demonstration initiative funded through the Office of Violence Against Women. Jennifer works as a consultant to Futures without Violence, The National Resource Center on Domestic Violence, and The National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges. Jennifer received her BA in Anthropology and Women’s Studies from Fort Lewis College and her MSW from San Jose State University.

Amarinthia Torres

Amarinthia Torres

Amarinthia Torres is the Community Advocate Program Manager for The NW Network of Bi, Trans, Lesbian, and Gay Survivors of Abuse. She works with LGBTQ survivors of sexual and domestic violence, co-facilitates weekly support groups, and manages the adult community advocacy program. After living most of her life in various small towns and cities in the rural South, Amarinthia moved to Seattle from Atlanta, Georgia in 2010. Her professional experience over the last 11 years has centered on work within the anti-sexual violence movement. Her work has included advocacy, program coordination, supervision of volunteer advocates, primary prevention education, and community based trainings. Amarinthia also worked at the Georgia Commission on Family Violence, an agency created by the state legislature to address and reduce the occurrence of domestic violence in the state of Georgia. Amarinthia earned a BA in Sociology/Anthropology with a minor in Women’s Studies from Berry College in Rome, GA.