Between 2012 an 2014, the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges in partnership with the U.S. Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women Safe Havens: Supervised Visitation and Safe Exchange Grant Program (Supervised Visitation Program) conducted an interactive series of training segments specifically for currently funded communities.

These "Ask-an-Expert" segments allowed Supervised Visitation Program grantees an opportunity to interact with other grantees on problem-solving exercises and ask subject matter experts questions about topics relevant to the Supervised Visitation Program grantees and their collaborative partners. These "Ask an Expert" segments provided tips, suggestions, and guidance on how to enhance your center's work around supervised visitation and domestic violence.

The recordings for each Ask-an-Expert segment, as well as their descriptions, materials, and more are provided below for your reference.

Documenting Visitation

July 28, 2014

Documenting visits at supervised visitation centers is a challenge. Center staff must determine how to fulfill their obligations to the courts, their clients and their community stakeholders while keeping safety their top priority. What should be written down about a visit? What is better left unrecorded? How should records be stored? Who should have access to them?

Tiffany Martinez

Tiffany Martinez

Project Director
Michigan Domestic and Sexual Violence Prevention and Treatment Board

Ms. Martinez is a licensed clinical social worker. She has dedicated her career to working with those affected by domestic violence, sexual assault, and child abuse. She has served in many capacities; functioning within the child welfare system as a foster care worker, providing family, individual, and group therapy to victims of violence, and most recently acting as director of a supervised visitation and exchange program. Currently, Ms. Martinez acts as an independent consultant providing training and technical assistance both locally and nationally on issues relating to family violence and supervised visitation and exchange. She obtained her master’s degree in social work from the University of Michigan in 1996.

Get It, Got It, Give It: Managing Information Safely & Fairly

June 9, 2014

Balancing safety and fairness in managing the information about their clients is an ongoing challenge for supervised visitation centers. This webinar teachs viewers to insure that: 1) their information-gathering practices are client-centered, 2) their information retention and storage practices are safe and appropriate, and 3) they understand the legal and ethical considerations relevant to responding to requests for information about their clients.

Alicia Aiken

Alicia Aiken, JD

Executive Director
Confidentiality Institute

Ms. Aiken is the Executive Director of the Confidentiality Institute, which provides training and technical assistance to organizations around the country on enhancing the safety of domestic violence survivors through practices that protect victims’ confidentiality.

Julie Kunce-Field

Julie Kunce-Field

Judge
Colorado 8th District Court

Judge Kunce-Field is the founder of the Confidentiality Institute and its former executive director, until she was appointed to the bench in 2011. She is a former law professor and has taught about issues of privacy and confidentiality to students, lawyers, judges and other professionals across the country.

Supervised Visitation: When Children Refuse to Visit

November 18, 2013

BIt is not uncommon to have children refuse to see their parent when they arrive at visitation centers. While there are many reasons for their refusal, we know this poses many questions and sometimes challenges for programs and their communities. During this Ask-an-Expert segment we will critically examine our role with children and youth, supporting children and youth, and exploring strategies for working with community partners to create a more seamless response to children and youth using visitation and exchange programs.

Jennifer Rose

Jennifer Rose

Co-Director
Inspire Action for Social Change

Jennifer Rose, an advocate for battered women and their children and an activist in the battered women’s movement for more than 15 years, she is a national consultant on issues effecting battered women and their children, including supervised visitation. Currently, Ms. Rose serves as a consultant for the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges, Praxis International, and Futures Without Violence. Ms. Rose holds a Master’s degree in social work and is currently the Co-Director for national technical assistance provider Inspire Action for Social Change.

When Women Use Violence in Cases of Domestic Violence

September 30, 2013

Since the implementation of mandatory arrest policies there has been in increase in the arrest of women in cases of domestic violence. Are the women who are being arrested batterers, resisting battering, or neither? This webinar explores the answers to that question. To be effective, interventions for women who use violence must address the contextual factors of women’s lives. This workshop will increase your understanding of women’s use of violence in intimate relationships and the most effective interventions in these cases in a supervised visitation center.

Melissa Scaia

Melissa Scaia

Executive Director
Advocates for Family Peace

Melissa Scaia will lead this segment. She is the executive director of Advocates for Family Peace (AFFP), a six-program agency that provides services to families experiencing domestic violence and child abuse in Itasca and northern St. Louis counties in Minnesota. As the executive director of AFFP she provides leadership to the organization, organizes and leads the Coordinated Community Responses (CCR) for both counties, co-facilitates a group for men who batter, and co-facilitates a group with women who have used violence. She is also a consulting trainer for a number of national training organizations on domestic violence and child abuse, including Praxis International and the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges. Recently she co-wrote a curriculum and DVD for working with men who batter as fathers entitled, “Addressing Fatherhood with Men Who Batter”. She also co-authored a curriculum and DVD with Ellen Pence, PhD and Laura Connelly for working with women who have used violence in intimate relationships entitled, “Turning Points: A Nonviolence Curriculum for Women."

Documentation Practices That Account for Safety

August 27, 2013

Documentation in supervised visitation and exchange centers can play a critical role in providing for the safety of adult survivors and their children. This segment focuses on the role of the supervised visitation and exchange providers and how that role impacts documentation practices. Viewers will learn how to critically examine the types of information gathered at supervised visitation and exchange centers and determine what information should be documented.

Tiffany Martinez

Tiffany Martinez

Project Director
Michigan Domestic and Sexual Violence Prevention and Treatment Board

Ms. Martinez is a licensed clinical social worker. She has dedicated her career to working with those affected by domestic violence, sexual assault, and child abuse. She has served in many capacities; functioning within the child welfare system as a foster care worker, providing family, individual, and group therapy to victims of violence, and most recently acting as director of a supervised visitation and exchange program. Currently, Ms. Martinez acts as an independent consultant providing training and technical assistance both locally and nationally on issues relating to family violence and supervised visitation and exchange. She obtained her master’s degree in social work from the University of Michigan in 1996.

Engaging Cultural Differences Within the Context of Supervised Visitation

July 29, 2013

Much debate surrounds the definition of culture as the behaviors and shared beliefs characteristic of a particular social or ethnic group, including values, customs, practices, and societal behavior. This segment focuses on a critical redefinition of culture using more current understandings of the term.

It then explores the role of a critical redefinition of culture in the provision of supervised visitation program services, and provides suggestions for communities and organizations aimed at crafting centers that are responsive to the cultural needs of the families and communities they serve while focusing on safety.

As a result of this segment, you will be better able to:
  • Define the terms culture and cultural competency.
  • Identify ways in which culture is relevant in every encounter within the supervised visitation context.
  • Engage in conversations around challenging cultural practices that staff may encounter when providing services.
  • Develop basic strategies that enhance the accommodation of different values and needs.
  • Lay the foundation of a culturally responsive center.
Sujata Warrier

Sujata Warrier, Ph.D

Director
New York State Office for the Prevention of Domestic Violence

Dr. Sujata Warrier is the director of the New York City Program of the New York State Office for the Prevention of Domestic Violence. She trains and provides technical assistance to professionals in various systems such as health care, law enforcement, criminal and civil justice, and human and social services on the issue of domestic violence. Additionally, she provides assistance on legislative and policy issues on battered immigrant women for the state. She has also trained extensively at the local, state, national, and international levels on the issue of cultural competency for various professionals and has delivered numerous keynotes on the issue of culture, competency, relativism, domestic violence, and violence against women. She has written and published numerous articles on violence against women in the international context. She received her Ph.D. from the Maxwell School of Syracuse University.

The Importance of Check-Ins in Supervised Visitation and Exchange

May 13, 2013

Building ongoing relationship with women, men, and children is an important strategy for supporting safety in our programs. As centers, we should recognize that supervised visitation and exchange is not a one-time event in the lives of families’. It is important for programs to carve out on going opportunities to check in with everyone using the center. This segment explores opportunities, challenges, and strategies for operationalizing check-ins into your programs.

Jennifer Rose

Jennifer Rose

Co-Director
Inspire Action for Social Change

Jennifer Rose, an advocate for battered women and their children and an activist in the battered women’s movement for more than 15 years, she is a national consultant on issues effecting battered women and their children, including supervised visitation. Currently, Ms. Rose serves as a consultant for the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges, Praxis International, and Futures Without Violence. Ms. Rose holds a Master’s degree in social work and is currently the Co-Director for national technical assistance provider Inspire Action for Social Change.

Working with Abusive Fathers in Supervised Visitation

March 29, 2013

This segment explores advocacy topics such as: how the visitation center works with people in the center and how it can enhance the experience of each person using the center, while also decreasing risk to adult victims and their children, and support a change process for batterers. This segment addresses Supervised Visitation Program Guiding Principle IV, Respectful and Fair Interaction. This Guiding Principal recommends that visitation centers should treat every individual using their services with fairness, while taking into account the abuse that has occurred within the family.

Juan Carlos Areán

Juan Carlos Areán

Director of the National Latin@ Network for Healthy Families and Communities
Casa de Esperanza

Juan Carlos Areán is the director of the National Latin@ Network for Healthy Families and Communities, a project of Casa de Esperanza. Since 1991, he has worked to engage men across different cultures to become better fathers, intimate partners and allies to end domestic violence and achieve gender equity. Previously, he worked at Futures Without Violence, formerly Family Violence Prevention Fund, the Men's Resource Center for Change and Harvard University. Juan Carlos is the lead developer of Futures Without Violence’s Fathering After Violence Initiative and co-producer of the groundbreaking documentary Something my Father Would Do. He is co-author of various articles, curricula and educational tools for men, including Working With Fathers in Batterer Intervention Programs (Oxford University Press) and Fathering After Violence: Enhancing safety for women and children post separation (FWV). He is a founding member of the United Nations Network of Men Leaders to combat violence against women by Secretary General Ban Ki-moon. Mr. Areán is an active trainer, who has led hundreds of workshops and presentations throughout the United States, as well as in Mexico, Canada, Chile, Brazil, Russia, Austria, Sweden, Bermuda, the US Congress and the United Nations.

Advocacy for Adult and Children Victims

December 18, 2012

This segment explores advocacy topics such as: what is advocacy, the role of the center staff around advocacy, confidentiality limits, how supervised visitation advocacy differs from domestic violence advocacy, meaningful linkages to resources, relationship building, and working as part of a larger system.

Jennifer Rose

Jennifer Rose

Co-Director
Inspire Action for Social Change

Jennifer Rose, an advocate for battered women and their children and an activist in the battered women’s movement for more than 15 years, she is a national consultant on issues effecting battered women and their children, including supervised visitation. Currently, Ms. Rose serves as a consultant for the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges, Praxis International, and Futures Without Violence. Ms. Rose holds a Master’s degree in social work and is currently the Co-Director for national technical assistance provider Inspire Action for Social Change.